A New God
"Many, many years ago, in the time prior to the age of cities, a shepherd conceived   that events were governed by chance. This caused the shepherd tremendous anxiety,   but he was able to keep his revelation to himself. In point of fact, he was   compelled to silence because with this law of hazard came its twin realization,   the certainty that man is little more than a savage beast, lost in the wilderness.   As the shepherd herded his flocks, he became more and more anxious about the   preservation of his own luck. One night, as he lay shivering beneath the stars,   listening to the baying of the wolves, feeling his terror mount, he swore that   if he lived to see the sunrise, he would deny himself food the following day.   How the shepherd rejoiced when he awoke! He resolved to make that day a day   of fasting each year, so happy was he not to have been consumed by wolves.   Soon the shepherd had committed himself to the following actions: repeating   two incantations each time the sun passed behind a cloud; circumnavigating   the tall stone in the circular valley ten times on the eve of a waning moon;   beating his head with a stick on occasions of strange imaginings or impure   thoughts; shouting to the setting sun each evening, imploring it to return;   the list goes on. The gods were baffled by the shepherd’s peculiar actions. Whatever can he be doing? they asked themselves. A particularly wise god in their midst realized what was happening:  “He is building a god.”  The gods all became silent and watched the man further; he was drawing a shape in the mud with the tip of his staff. His hands gripped it so tightly that they bled. The night winds were blowing from the mountains, and the gods felt a chill pass through them. For on their perches high in the starry firmament, another god was beginning to coalesce among them. The gods looked at each other in horror as the implications of this creation dawned on them.  “Who then created men?” they implored the wise god.  “Hazard,” he replied.  Some of the gods became angry and said: “We should kill that man!”  “Who says that is a man?” the wise one responded.  “Then we should kill his god!” they replied, looking to the still-nascent being next to them.  “Who says that is a god?” the wise one replied."
~ Kahn and Selesnick

A New God

"Many, many years ago, in the time prior to the age of cities, a shepherd conceived that events were governed by chance. This caused the shepherd tremendous anxiety, but he was able to keep his revelation to himself. In point of fact, he was compelled to silence because with this law of hazard came its twin realization, the certainty that man is little more than a savage beast, lost in the wilderness. As the shepherd herded his flocks, he became more and more anxious about the preservation of his own luck. One night, as he lay shivering beneath the stars, listening to the baying of the wolves, feeling his terror mount, he swore that if he lived to see the sunrise, he would deny himself food the following day. How the shepherd rejoiced when he awoke! He resolved to make that day a day of fasting each year, so happy was he not to have been consumed by wolves. Soon the shepherd had committed himself to the following actions: repeating two incantations each time the sun passed behind a cloud; circumnavigating the tall stone in the circular valley ten times on the eve of a waning moon; beating his head with a stick on occasions of strange imaginings or impure thoughts; shouting to the setting sun each evening, imploring it to return; the list goes on. The gods were baffled by the shepherd’s peculiar actions. Whatever can he be doing? they asked themselves. A particularly wise god in their midst realized what was happening: “He is building a god.” The gods all became silent and watched the man further; he was drawing a shape in the mud with the tip of his staff. His hands gripped it so tightly that they bled. The night winds were blowing from the mountains, and the gods felt a chill pass through them. For on their perches high in the starry firmament, another god was beginning to coalesce among them. The gods looked at each other in horror as the implications of this creation dawned on them. “Who then created men?” they implored the wise god. “Hazard,” he replied. Some of the gods became angry and said: “We should kill that man!” “Who says that is a man?” the wise one responded. “Then we should kill his god!” they replied, looking to the still-nascent being next to them. “Who says that is a god?” the wise one replied."

~ Kahn and Selesnick